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Councillor Wong-Tam Announces Launch of Yonge Street Environmental Assessment

Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, joined by Mark Garner, Executive Director of the Downtown Yonge Business Improvement Area, Dr. Mohamed Lachemi, President of Ryerson University, and Gary Switzer, CEO of MOD Developments, announced today the release of the RFP for the Yonge Street Environment Assessment (EA).  The EA is the culmination of years of advocacy and consultation.

 

In 2011, the renowned architects and urban thinkers Marianne McKenna of KPMB Architects and Ken Greenberg co-authored the Yonge Street Planning Framework, laying the initial foundation for a new vision of Yonge Street, calling for improved public spaces, innovative wayfinding, fine grain retail expressions, heritage and cultural preservation, and wider sidewalks. 

 

Celebrate Yonge, a pilot program launched in the summer of 2012, put those recommendations into action.  Converting both curb lanes on Yonge Street between Gerrard and Queen into dynamic public spaces for patios and performance, Celebrate Yonge successfully demonstrated the desire for a more flexible pedestrian friendly street.

 

In 2014, the Downtown Yonge BIA launched Yonge Love, a seven month long community consultation, gathering feedback from thousands of participants from across the City. The campaign clearly illustrated support for widened sidewalks, pedestrian only events, public art, and unique retail opportunities.  

 

The next step in this process, the Environmental Assessment will focus on designing the new public realm, with consideration given to reconfiguring the street towards increasing pedestrian space, cycling infrastructure, tree planting, lighting, pavement treatments and street furniture. 

 

There is significant support for revitalizing Yonge Street from community stakeholders and Torontonians, who will be provided with numerous opportunities to get involved and have their say about the future of Yonge Street.

 

Media Contacts:

 

Councillor Wong-Tam

416-392-7903

councillor_wongtam@toronto.ca

 

Mark Garner, Downtown Yonge BIA

416-597-0255 ext. 225

mgarner@downtownyonge.com

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Media Advisory: Councillor Wong-Tam to announce the launch of Yonge Street Environmental Assessment

Media Advisory: Councillor Wong-Tam to announce the launch of Yonge Street Environmental Assessment

 

July 12, 2016

 

Councillor Wong-Tam will be joined by Mark Garner, Executive Director of the Downtown Yonge Business Improvement Area, Dr. Mohamed Lachemi, President of Ryerson University, and Gary Switzer, CEO of MOD Developments, to announce the launch of the Yonge Street Environment Assessment.

 

Beginning with the Yonge Street Planning Framework in 2011 and carrying through to Celebrate Yonge in 2012 and the Yonge Love Campaign, the future of Yonge Street has generated much thought, conversation, and excitement.  Councillor Wong-Tam is delighted to announce the next big step in shaping the future design and experience of Yonge Street.

 

Date: Thursday, July 14 2016

Time: 12:30pm

Location: 341 Yonge Street, Ryerson Student Learning Centre (Front of Building)

 

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Media Contacts:

 

Councillor Wong-Tam

416-392-7903

councillor_wongtam@toronto.ca

 

Mark Garner, Downtown Yonge BIA

416-597-0255 ext. 225

mgarner@downtownyonge.com

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Councillor Wong-Tam's Statement on Toronto Police Chief's Statement on 1981 Bathhouse Raids

The statement of regret by Chief Mark Saunders on the 1981 gay bathhouse raids this week was an important step towards mending a historic wrong that was done in our City. While many are pleased to see the Toronto Police expressing regret, we still have some ways to go in addressing the lives that were ruined. I believe we still need to see a more meaningful apology with proper restitution.

A true apology means taking responsibility for doing something that was wrong. There never was an investigation into who ordered the raids and those whose lives were torn apart were never compensated for the emotional, physical, and financial damage done to them. I hold out the hope that we will yet see an admission of guilt adequate to provide the closure many directly affected still look for.

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Toronto Women Speaking Up: Life in The City

News Release

March 29, 2016

Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam to moderate Salon 27 panel discussion.

Toronto Women Speaking Up: Life in The City

Date: Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Time: 6:00 PM

Location: Ryerson Student Learning Centre Amphitheatre (341 Yonge Street), Ground Floor

Accessibility: Location is accessible

Women are subjected to discrimination and violence every day; yet many will stay silent in fear of further violence, not being believed. The experiences of gender-based bias in health care, the workplace, and law enforcement is compounded by cultural insensitivity, racism, and ablism.

The Muslim community, in particular women wearing head coverings, are targets of Islamophobic violence in our city and in Canada. Anti-Black racism is an ongoing and systemic issue directed towards members of the Black community. Incidents of race-based violence remain largely underreported.

Many believe the criminal justice system does not meet the needs of sexual assault survivors leaving the majority to experience further victimization.  Sexual assault is common in public spaces including TTC properties. Most female TTC riders are not aware of what the term "sexual assault" legally covers. Therefore many incidents will go unreported.

Aboriginal women are at a greater risk of violence and racism than non-Aboriginal women in Canada. The rising number of missing and murdered Aboriginal women is alarmingly high and disproportionate with no resolution in sight despite a national inquiry underway.

Toronto is not a fully accessible city for people living with disabilities. Sadly, 60% of women with disability experience some form of violence in their life time. According to Statistics Canada women with severe/very severe disabilities also experience poverty and unemployment at higher levels than their male counterparts.

It is 2016 – we still have not achieved wage equality. Currently in Ontario women earn 74 cents on the male dollar. Pay equity remains an illusionary aspiration.

Tonight, Councillor Wong-Tam will be moderating a panel with four inspiring women for a night of uncensored discussion about their experience and life in the city. Salon 27 creates an opportunity to have a frank and inclusive discussion about Toronto women's equity, safety and civic participation.

Panelists:

Caitlyn E. Kasper – Staff Lawyer, Aboriginal Legal Services

Terri-Lynn Langdon – MSW, RSW, disAbled Social Worker and Social Justice Activist

Abigail Moriah - Associate Development Manager, Regent Park Revitalization, Toronto Community Housing and Civic Action diverse City Fellows

Jessica Mustachi – Safety Program Coordinator, Metropolitan Action Committee on Violence Against Women and Children (METRAC)

 

Media contact:

Melissa Wong, Director, Policy, and Operations

Office of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, Ward 27

416-392-7903

Councillor_wongtam@toronto.ca

 

 

 

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Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam's Statement on the Jian Ghomeshi Verdict

Today in one of the most followed cases of the year, Mr. Ghomeshi was found not guilty on all charges related to sexual violence. Before anything, I would like to speak to the survivors of this case and all women who have been subject to sexual violence. While I respect the rule of law and the legitimacy of our criminal justice system, I recognize that sometimes the difference between the legal guilt and factual guilt is pronounced. Therefore, I am of the firm belief that today’s result shall not in any way undermine or repudiate the reality of what has happened to you. We believe you - and we thank you for inspiring us with your courage by coming forward to tell your story and to fight for the belief that no matter how many years have passed, or how wealthy or well-respected the abuser is, sexual violence will not be tolerated in Canada. Thank you for leading the way.

The significance of this trial goes well beyond any conviction or acquittal.  Mr. Ghomeshi’s case has sent us all a clear message that there are serious flaws in the way that we deal with sexual assault cases. And of course the problem does not only lie within our criminal justice system. Let us not forget that our criminal justice system is founded upon the principles of fundamental justice as enshrined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedom. We firmly believe in the presumption of innocence as it is a fundamental human right and indispensable for preventing wrongful convictions and upholding justice. However, it is the time to acknowledge that if our criminal justice system does not adapt itself to the reality of cases like this, its legitimacy will be undermined in the eyes of Canadians. Our justice system gains its legitimacy by being effective and fair; and fairness needs to extend to both survivors and offenders.

This case clearly showed us that our system is not easy to navigate for the survivors of sexual assaults, who already feel traumatized by the experience. We should ask ourselves: How much support and information is provided to the survivors during the process? Are the survivors usually aware of the realities of an adversarial system? Do sexual assault survivors understand what a true cross-examination entails before being subject to vigorous questioning? Do they fully appreciate the Crown’s duty of full disclosure? Or the high standard of beyond reasonable doubt? We cannot expect the survivors to trust our system of justice if it is not easily accessible to them; if they do not know how to use it; and if they do not know who to turn to when they are in need.

Do we need more resources to support and educate survivors? Should we move away from our adversarial system? Do we need to lower the standard of proof? Should the accused be compelled to testify? These are all questions where the answers are not easily attainable. One thing though is certain; the status quo is not good enough and the numbers attest to that.

  • 1 in 4 North American women will be sexually assaulted during their lifetime
  • Of every 100 incidents of sexual assault, only 6 are reported to the police
  • Only 1 - 2% of "date rape" sexual assaults are reported to the police
  • 83% of women with disabilities will be sexually assaulted during their lifetime
  • 57% of Aboriginal women have been sexually abused

The numbers are alarming. Now, we all have a duty to bring change and our duty goes well beyond the criminal justice system. We have a duty to empower survivors. We should work to overcome the obstacles that prevent survivors to talk freely and openly about sexual assaults. We have to create a culture that allows women to speak up without the fear of being judged by a society that is still filled with stereotypes. We need to instill confident in survivors. They should be able to stand up and talk - not just in courtrooms, but in police stations, campuses, schools, and workplaces. Mr. Ghomeshi's case is just a beginning for us. We should all act.

In the words of the Honourable L’Heureux-Dubé: "Violence against women is as much a matter of equality as it is an offence against human dignity and a violation of human rights." 

 

 

 

 

 

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